World Series Decline and Two Reasons For It

I was schocked to read that TV audiences for the first two World Series games were 12.2 million and 12.9 million viewers. That means TV non-sense like The Walking Dead, NCIS:New Orleans and the vapid Big Bang Theory have larger audiences. The significance of this decline is shown by historical numbers, like 1978’s 44 million viewers and 34.5 million for the last time the Royals appeared in 1985. I offer this last piece of information for those who will claim that having a small market team causes the meager ratings.
I think we should look at the adoption of interleague play every day as a cause. At one time, I was told by an NFL executive that he envied the clear distinction between the leagues that baseball enjoyed. This clear distinction formed strong league affliliations among fans who tuned in to see their league beat the other league. Now, with interleague play everyday, the World Series has become just another interleague play series and there is no drama, other than having two great teams play each other.
Of course, this is a series between two wild-card teams that didn’t even win their own divisions!  Fans of division winners may not be tuning in out of spite, knowing their Cardinas, Orioles, Tigers, Angels, Dodgers and Nationals were the superior teams. I can’t argue with this as I hought the best teams were the Nationals and Orioles. That would have produced a very well viewed World Series with true champions representing their leagues.
By the way, I am rooting for the Royals because I am an American League fan as well as an AL Central fan.
I’ll be watching tonight just after my wife and I finish playing in our tennis league. We expect to win there, by the way.  I will never watch any of the aforementioned TV series for any reason.
Update: Sima and I won our match 6-7 (11-13 tiebreaker), 5-0 in a time limited set. The match was settled by a 7-4 tie breaker win. The match took over two hours and I am feeling the effects today.

Baseball; The Long Season Ends, Not With a Bang But a Whimper

The Boston Red Sox won the sixth and final World Series game of 2013 when they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1. It seemed that the Cardinals, who out hit the Red Sox 9-8, just couldn’t win this important game as the key moments all belonged to the Red Sox. The prime moment came in the third inning, when, after Dustin Pedroia singled, Series MVP, David Ortiz was walked intentionally. He batted .688 for the Series. With two on and two out, Michael Wacha hit Jonny Gomes, loading the bases, setting the stage for the big hit. Shane Victorino then cleared the bases with a hit off the wall in left. The key element here was that Wacha hit Gomes. This indicated that his control was off, he didn’t have the command that had allowed him to pitch superbly in post-season games resulting in a 4-0 record. That he was not the master this night was evident earlier as well as he allowed runners in the first two innings. This lack of command then produced the big hit when he fell behind Victorino 2-0. Victorino guessed fast ball and got it and it was up in the zone and inside, but not far enough. His hit off the Green Monster, as the left field fence in known in Fenway Park, was the game. A homerun by slumping Stephen Drew and RBI singles by Mike Napoli and Victorino, again, in the fourth ended Red Sox scoring, but it was enough.

The Cardinals never got it going in this game, or, for that matter, the last three. Their win in game three on the rarely used obstruction call (See explanation here) was their high point. After that, they were flat and lost. There is always hope in Baseball where there is no clock to end the game and a team always has a chance to continue play. Here, the final inning went in few pitches and two fly ball outs and a final strike out of Matt Carpenter on a 2-2 pitch by Koji Uehara, the Red Sox closer, ended it, not with a bang, but a whimper.

The long season that begins in the first week of April and ends the last week of October, is now over. I wrote many posts on this season that are available in the archives and can only wait for 2014. A year ago, the Red Sox finished last and now join the 1991 Minnesota Twins as the two teams who have gone from worst to first in one year. I have little hope that will happen soon. Go Cubs? Maybe not this year.

World Series Games Four and Five: Cardinals Go Flat, Ortiz the Alpha

After the obstruction call decided the third game in their favor, the Cardinals have gone flat. This means that they can’t hit when it counts, and in this case, they aren’t hitting at all getting six hits in the fourth game and only four last night in a quiet 3-1 loss. Thus the last two games have been Red Sox victories without serious Cardinals challenges. 

The Fourth Game did have its moment with Kolten Wong, on first running for Allen Craig, was picked off to end the game. Where game three was the first World Series Game that ended on an obstruction call, this was the first World Series game that ended on a pickoff.  The fifth game ended without drama. Trevor Rosenthal struck out three Red Sox in the top of the inning and Koji Uehara got a called third strike, (the zone was a bit enlarged in this game!!) and ground ball out and a fly ball third out to end the game.

The drama here is the continued batting exploits of the Red Sox David Ortiz. He went 3 for 4 last night and is batting. 733 for the series. He was 3-3 in the fourth game, 1-2   with two walks in the third, 2-3 one walk in the second and 2-3 in the first game,  that is 11 hits in 15 World Series at bats. I am sure the folks at Elias Sports will give us the historical perspective soon. For example, he reached base on nine consecutive at-bats, a World Series and is batting over. 450 for his World Series career of thirteen games. What is  most surprising is that Ortiz came to Major Leagues in 1997 as a Minnesota Twin, and was released by them after the 2002 season. Released!!! The Twins were trying to make him a “slap hitting, go to left with soft line drives like Mauer hitter,” and the man who would be known as Big Papi wanted to just hit it hard. Boston signed him after the Twins released him and allowed him to do just that. Maybe the Twins should have had Mauer hit like Ortiz instead.

David Ortiz is the Red Sox Alpha, that leader who sets the stage for the others, and he will win this World Series, unless, of course, the baseball gods think differently.  Like those on Mount Olympus in ancient days, these gods don’t like perfection which they reserve for themselves and like to prove to heroes that they are mere mortals after all.

Let’s see what happens here, I am betting on David Ortiz. 

World Series Game Three: A Rarely Used Rule Decides the Game

Last night’s game in St. Louis ended with an umpire’s ruling that Red Sox third baseman, Will Middlebrooks, obstructed the Cardinal’s Allen Craig’s effort to score on a throw that got past Middlebrooks.   The situation is as follows. The game was in the bottom of the ninth iñning tied at 4-4. After one out, Molina singled off Brandon Workman and Manager Farrell brought in closer Koji Uehara and Allen Craig doubled on the first pitch putting runners on second and third with one out.

(NOTE: This was the third game between these two very good teams and such teams know how to win games. The hitters have seen the pitchers now, and are starting to figure out how to hit them. Koji Uehara likes to throw first pitch strikes and seldom walks hitters, so attacking the first pitch is the smart move. In the top of the eighth inning, the Red Sox had scored when Daniel Nava, facing the remarkable Trevor Rosenthal on a 0-2 pitch, hit it “up the middle” to score the tying run. This is the way many tight games are decided when smart players do the smart thing. Both Craig and Nava did the smart thing against a pitcher with whom they were now familiar.)

Then the fun started.  John Jay hit the ball sharply to second and Justin Pedroia, one the the handfull of players around who make the great play when necessary, made one here by diving to his right, fielding the ball and throwing home to beat Molina. On the play, Craig advanced to third and Jarrod Saltalamacchia threw just a bit to Middlebrooks’ left and the ball glanced off Craig’s arm. Middlebrooks dove to catch the throw and was lying on the ground, his feet even with the bag and his body between Craig and homeplate. If he remained still, the outcome may have been different, but he raised his lower legs and Craig attempted to step over him on his way home; he tripped. The umpire immediatley ruled obstruction and awarded Craig home even though Nava’s throw from left beat the runner to the plate. It was the correct call. The time from Jay’s swing to Craig’s run took less than 15 seconds.

The rule invoked at this time was Official Playing Rule 7.06 that says “obstructed runners shall be awarded one base. . . ,” and 7.09J says “obstruction. .  . should be called only in very flagrant and violent cases. . .” The definitional section under Rule 2.0 defines Obstruction as the act of a fielder, while not in possesion of the ball and not in the act of fielding the ball, impedes the progress of any runner.” “Impede” is a sufficiently
vague term to allow some prosecutorial lattitude. Had Middlebrooks dove in the act of attempting to field the ball and had stayed there, Craig would have had to step over him to advance home. Even if Craig tripped stepping over Craig, no obstruction would have been called, but he made an overt act that materially impeded Craig. Middlebrooks did the smart act; he tried to prevent the run. The umpire exersized his prosecutorial lattitude and ruled it Obstruction and 2013 World Series Game Three became the only such game to be decided on such a call.

When I spent my time studying the rules, I once asked a senior umpire about the play where a batter hits a swinging bunt in front of the plate and the runner and catcher collide while the runner is attempting to run to first and the catcher is attempting to field the ball. It is the collision of the “Interference Rule,” where a runner interfers with the fielder while fielding a ball, and the “Obstruction Rule.” The umpire looked at me and said, “Clark, that would be an act of God.” Such is baseball.

World Series Game Two: Cardinals beat the Red Sox and It Was Easy.

A team wins “easy” when it pitches superbly, and the other team throws the ball away so runs score. That is the story of Game Two of this World Series. The Cardnals used three pitchers in this game, Michael Wacha started and gave up two runs in the sixth by walking Justin Pedroia before David Ortiz homered over the fence to left. Wacha is 4-0 in postseason play and rarely allows this sort of event to happen as his previous 18 1/3 innings had been scoreless. He was followed by Carlos Martinez who got six outs, three by strikeouts in the seventh and eighth innings before Trevor Rosenthal struck out three Red Sox on eleven pitches in the ninth to end the game. It was easy. Wacha and Martinez are twenty-two years old, Rosenthal is twenty-three.

The four Cardinal’s runs were scored in the fourth on a Matt Holliday triple and a Yadier Molina ground out. Then in the seventh, it was really interesting. After David Freese walked with one out, and Jon Jay singled to right, moving Freese to second and causing the removal of Red Sox Pitcher, John Lackey, for Craig Brelsow. Pete Kozma pinch ran for Freese at second and he and Jay then stole third and second. I was watching this and I noted that Kozma did not have a big lead off of second. When he and Jay ran, I was startled and so was Red Sox catcher Saltalamachia,  who bobbled the pitch and couldn’t make a throw. Breslow then walked Daniel Descalso to load the bases with one out. Matt Carpenther then hit  a sacrifice fly to left that scored Kozma and,  ultimalely, Jay, as the throw from the outfielder was way off line and to the catcher’s right. Instead of getting in front of the throw,(which had no chance of getting Kozma) to keep Jay in place at second, he let it go past as he merely reached across his body to snare the throw. It was fielded by pitcher Breslow, backing up the play. Jay saw this and took off for third. Now experienced baseball people cringe whenever a pitcher has to make a 120 foot throw on level ground. These are people who throw downhill, and only sixty feet, to earn a living. So Breslow, on level ground, threw the ball over the thirdbaseman and into the stands, scoring Jay for the go-ahead third run. Daniel Decalso had been watching this from first base, a great vantage point, by the way, and started running and ended up on third. He scored on Carlos Beltran’s single. 4-2 Cardinals. Then that young fellow Martinez came in to pitch the seventh, and you already know the outcome of that story.

This was the second game of a seven game series. They now play three in St. Louis, and we will either have a champion or a team with a 3-2 lead going back to Fenway Park for the Halloween game. The homefield advantage is real, but the home team must win and the Red Sox split. Now the Cardinals have the advantage of playing in St. Louis against the lesser lights of the Red Sox rotation and there will be no DH. The Cardinals just may win three. We’ll see. As I told a fellow earlier, I like the Red Sox but I have learned not to bet against the Cardinals, the best organization in the game.

World Series Game One: Cardinals Give a Game to the Red Sox

The Red Sox won World Series Game One last night 8-1 on a series of Cardinal mistakes, great Red Sox pitching (or poor Cardinals hitting), and some timely hitting. It was 5-0 after two innings. The Cardinals allowed a pop up to land near the mound, flubbed a potential double play, bounced a pick off attempt, bobbled a  ball in the outfield, and allowed a wild pitch, and those are the events I recalled this morning. The lone St. Louis run came in the ninth as Matt Holliday homered to left center field.
The teams play tonight and remember this is baseball and last night will have no impact on tonight. Baseball players are accustomed to losing as even the best teams lose 40% of the time.  The unavoidable fact here is that home field advantage is a real advantage in the World Series and if that home field is Fenway Park, double the effect. The Cardinals will have to win one in Fenway to win the series, let’s hope tonight’s game is a more skillfully played contest and that the outcome is in doubt until the ninth.
As for my preference, it is for a seven game series as there is only the long, cold winter afterwards, so I like to have winners and losers alternate until game seven. GO Cards!!

MLB Playoffs: Tampa Bay at Texas, Winner to Cleveland and Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

The convoluted American League playoff scheme that could have occured had Cleveland lost yesterday did not occur as the Twins gave it to the Indians. However, Tampa Bay and Texas both won. They play one game to settle the issue today in Texas. Both teams will start left handers, David Price (9-8, 3.39) for the Rays and Martin Perez (10-5, 3.55) for Texas. “We’ll have to watch this one to see who wins,” said Nancy Pelosi, while lamenting the Giants (76-86) poor season.  Of course, the issue that will be settled today is just about who plays in the real Wild Card game in Cleveland on Wednesday.

If I were to hazard a opinion, I would give the edge to the Rangers based entirely on Joe Nathan, its closer. We’ll see.

The Pirates play the Reds tomorrow in Pittsburgh. The Reds will start Johnny Cueto (5-2, 2.82) and the Pirates will start Francisco Liriano (16-8, 3.02). Again, if I were going to hazard a guess here, I would flip a coin. (The flip just said Pittsburgh)

Where I have been focused on these wild card games,  the real fun starts with the Divisional Series, schedule here.

Some years ago, I was involved in discussions of playoff formats as the expansion of the major leagues would cause a change in league alignments and the force the creation of divisions. This is so no team would finish 12th (or now 15th) in the standings and more pennant races equals more local interest.

The creation of divisions, first East and West and then to East, West, Central, created the need for a WIld Card. or the non winning team with the highest winning percentage, so that two series could be played. That lead to the creation of a second wild card because Fox wanted another game.

The discussion I was involved in focused on who should play in the World Series. Some thought that the true league champions should play there and those were the two teams at the top of each league. The creation of divisions ended that argument, but now we have second wild cards eligible for the World Series. Maybe we have gone too far, but the money generated by broadcasts of extra games means this is permanent. The problem is that the extra games pushes the World Series into the second half of October. It is scheduled to end on October 31 this year and that is too far into the Fall to hold national interest as each sports league has its natural season and baseball games in late October just don’t work as well. World Series TV ratings illustrate this fact.

Nevertheless, I will watch them all as it is the greatest championship series of all, even though it may not reward the True league champions