Bart Giamatti’s “The Green Fields of the Mind,” After a Fenway Victory (Link Fixed)

Former Yale President and Baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti was a baseball fan. His writings reflect that and in this excerpted piece, you can get a feel for the man’s baseball passion.

                                                                 “The Green Fields of the Mind “

It breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall alone. You count on it, rely on it to buffer the passage of time, to keep the memory of sunshine and high skies alive, and then just when the days are all twilight, when you need it most, it stops. Today, October 2, a Sunday of rain and broken branches and leaf-clogged drains and slick streets, it stopped, and summer was gone.

Somehow, the summer seemed to slip by faster this time. Maybe it wasn’t this summer, but all the summers that, in this my fortieth summer, slipped by so fast. There comes a time when every summer will have something of autumn about it. Whatever the reason, it seemed to me that I was investing more and more in baseball, making the game do more of the work that keeps time fat and slow and lazy. I was counting on the game’s deep patterns, three strikes, three outs, three times three innings, and its deepest impulse, to go out and back, to leave and to return home, to set the order of the day and to organize the daylight. I wrote a few things this last summer, this summer that did not last, nothing grand but some things, and yet that work was just camouflage. The real activity was done with the radio–not the all-seeing, all-falsifying television–and was the playing of the game in the only place it will last, the enclosed green field of the mind. There, in that warm, bright place, what the old poet called Mutability does not so quickly come. . . .(The entire article can be found “Here.  I had dinner with Giamatti before he became Commissioner and he told me about his writing. When he was Commissioner,  he said “No one would publish this stuff, (including Yale University)  until I became Commissioner and now everyone wants to.”

During dinner, I recall we discussed baseball and our shared favorite song, “Amazing Grace” and replayed our shared favorite movie, “The Third Man.”  Dessert was shared chocolate fondue. It was a wonderful evening. 

Baseball; The Long Season Ends, Not With a Bang But a Whimper

The Boston Red Sox won the sixth and final World Series game of 2013 when they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1. It seemed that the Cardinals, who out hit the Red Sox 9-8, just couldn’t win this important game as the key moments all belonged to the Red Sox. The prime moment came in the third inning, when, after Dustin Pedroia singled, Series MVP, David Ortiz was walked intentionally. He batted .688 for the Series. With two on and two out, Michael Wacha hit Jonny Gomes, loading the bases, setting the stage for the big hit. Shane Victorino then cleared the bases with a hit off the wall in left. The key element here was that Wacha hit Gomes. This indicated that his control was off, he didn’t have the command that had allowed him to pitch superbly in post-season games resulting in a 4-0 record. That he was not the master this night was evident earlier as well as he allowed runners in the first two innings. This lack of command then produced the big hit when he fell behind Victorino 2-0. Victorino guessed fast ball and got it and it was up in the zone and inside, but not far enough. His hit off the Green Monster, as the left field fence in known in Fenway Park, was the game. A homerun by slumping Stephen Drew and RBI singles by Mike Napoli and Victorino, again, in the fourth ended Red Sox scoring, but it was enough.

The Cardinals never got it going in this game, or, for that matter, the last three. Their win in game three on the rarely used obstruction call (See explanation here) was their high point. After that, they were flat and lost. There is always hope in Baseball where there is no clock to end the game and a team always has a chance to continue play. Here, the final inning went in few pitches and two fly ball outs and a final strike out of Matt Carpenter on a 2-2 pitch by Koji Uehara, the Red Sox closer, ended it, not with a bang, but a whimper.

The long season that begins in the first week of April and ends the last week of October, is now over. I wrote many posts on this season that are available in the archives and can only wait for 2014. A year ago, the Red Sox finished last and now join the 1991 Minnesota Twins as the two teams who have gone from worst to first in one year. I have little hope that will happen soon. Go Cubs? Maybe not this year.

World Series Games Four and Five: Cardinals Go Flat, Ortiz the Alpha

After the obstruction call decided the third game in their favor, the Cardinals have gone flat. This means that they can’t hit when it counts, and in this case, they aren’t hitting at all getting six hits in the fourth game and only four last night in a quiet 3-1 loss. Thus the last two games have been Red Sox victories without serious Cardinals challenges. 

The Fourth Game did have its moment with Kolten Wong, on first running for Allen Craig, was picked off to end the game. Where game three was the first World Series Game that ended on an obstruction call, this was the first World Series game that ended on a pickoff.  The fifth game ended without drama. Trevor Rosenthal struck out three Red Sox in the top of the inning and Koji Uehara got a called third strike, (the zone was a bit enlarged in this game!!) and ground ball out and a fly ball third out to end the game.

The drama here is the continued batting exploits of the Red Sox David Ortiz. He went 3 for 4 last night and is batting. 733 for the series. He was 3-3 in the fourth game, 1-2   with two walks in the third, 2-3 one walk in the second and 2-3 in the first game,  that is 11 hits in 15 World Series at bats. I am sure the folks at Elias Sports will give us the historical perspective soon. For example, he reached base on nine consecutive at-bats, a World Series and is batting over. 450 for his World Series career of thirteen games. What is  most surprising is that Ortiz came to Major Leagues in 1997 as a Minnesota Twin, and was released by them after the 2002 season. Released!!! The Twins were trying to make him a “slap hitting, go to left with soft line drives like Mauer hitter,” and the man who would be known as Big Papi wanted to just hit it hard. Boston signed him after the Twins released him and allowed him to do just that. Maybe the Twins should have had Mauer hit like Ortiz instead.

David Ortiz is the Red Sox Alpha, that leader who sets the stage for the others, and he will win this World Series, unless, of course, the baseball gods think differently.  Like those on Mount Olympus in ancient days, these gods don’t like perfection which they reserve for themselves and like to prove to heroes that they are mere mortals after all.

Let’s see what happens here, I am betting on David Ortiz. 

World Series Game Three: A Rarely Used Rule Decides the Game

Last night’s game in St. Louis ended with an umpire’s ruling that Red Sox third baseman, Will Middlebrooks, obstructed the Cardinal’s Allen Craig’s effort to score on a throw that got past Middlebrooks.   The situation is as follows. The game was in the bottom of the ninth iñning tied at 4-4. After one out, Molina singled off Brandon Workman and Manager Farrell brought in closer Koji Uehara and Allen Craig doubled on the first pitch putting runners on second and third with one out.

(NOTE: This was the third game between these two very good teams and such teams know how to win games. The hitters have seen the pitchers now, and are starting to figure out how to hit them. Koji Uehara likes to throw first pitch strikes and seldom walks hitters, so attacking the first pitch is the smart move. In the top of the eighth inning, the Red Sox had scored when Daniel Nava, facing the remarkable Trevor Rosenthal on a 0-2 pitch, hit it “up the middle” to score the tying run. This is the way many tight games are decided when smart players do the smart thing. Both Craig and Nava did the smart thing against a pitcher with whom they were now familiar.)

Then the fun started.  John Jay hit the ball sharply to second and Justin Pedroia, one the the handfull of players around who make the great play when necessary, made one here by diving to his right, fielding the ball and throwing home to beat Molina. On the play, Craig advanced to third and Jarrod Saltalamacchia threw just a bit to Middlebrooks’ left and the ball glanced off Craig’s arm. Middlebrooks dove to catch the throw and was lying on the ground, his feet even with the bag and his body between Craig and homeplate. If he remained still, the outcome may have been different, but he raised his lower legs and Craig attempted to step over him on his way home; he tripped. The umpire immediatley ruled obstruction and awarded Craig home even though Nava’s throw from left beat the runner to the plate. It was the correct call. The time from Jay’s swing to Craig’s run took less than 15 seconds.

The rule invoked at this time was Official Playing Rule 7.06 that says “obstructed runners shall be awarded one base. . . ,” and 7.09J says “obstruction. .  . should be called only in very flagrant and violent cases. . .” The definitional section under Rule 2.0 defines Obstruction as the act of a fielder, while not in possesion of the ball and not in the act of fielding the ball, impedes the progress of any runner.” “Impede” is a sufficiently
vague term to allow some prosecutorial lattitude. Had Middlebrooks dove in the act of attempting to field the ball and had stayed there, Craig would have had to step over him to advance home. Even if Craig tripped stepping over Craig, no obstruction would have been called, but he made an overt act that materially impeded Craig. Middlebrooks did the smart act; he tried to prevent the run. The umpire exersized his prosecutorial lattitude and ruled it Obstruction and 2013 World Series Game Three became the only such game to be decided on such a call.

When I spent my time studying the rules, I once asked a senior umpire about the play where a batter hits a swinging bunt in front of the plate and the runner and catcher collide while the runner is attempting to run to first and the catcher is attempting to field the ball. It is the collision of the “Interference Rule,” where a runner interfers with the fielder while fielding a ball, and the “Obstruction Rule.” The umpire looked at me and said, “Clark, that would be an act of God.” Such is baseball.